Sunday, 28 October 2018

KEEP YOUR PET SAFE THIS SPRING

Spring is here and we want to keep your pet happy and healthy. Here are some spring hazards you should be aware of:

Bee and wasp stings can lead to pain and swelling at the site of the sting. Some pets can have an anaphylactic reaction to a sting and this can be life threatening. If you notice severe facial and/or neck swelling, difficulty breathing, excessive salivation, or collapse, you should seek veterinary advice immediately.

Snail and slug bait is very attractive to pets. Ingestion of small quantities can be rapidly fatal. Products that claim they are 'safe for pets' generally aren't - they have a bitter taste and this only acts as a deterrent. Some pets will still eat these highly toxic baits, so consider whether they are absolutely necessary in your garden.

Sunday, 14 October 2018

ANAL GLAND ISSUES

Have you ever seen your dog dragging his or her bottom along the ground? This peculiar act is known as 'scooting' and can indicate your dog has irritated anal glands.

The infamous anal glands are located on either side of your dog's anus. Each gland holds a small amount of a smelly brown liquid that is released as your pet does a poo. This custom scent is left on the poo and is used as a doggie calling card.

If the glands are not sufficiently expressed they can become impacted and uncomfortable. Dogs that suffer from allergies and itchy skin are also very susceptible to irritated anal glands.

Sunday, 30 September 2018

FELINE FRIENDLY WAITING AREA

We are trying out an optional cat only waiting area in our third consult room when it is available to try and prevent any curious dogs adding extra stress to our cats

There will be a choice of either FISH or BIRD watching on the television!


Wednesday, 5 September 2018

PROTECT YOUR PET AGAINST THE FLU

Have you ever wondered if your pet can get the flu? The answer is yes. But unlike the dreaded flu season for humans, dogs and cats can suffer from their version of the flu year-round. The good news is that your pet can't catch the human flu, and vice versa.

The dog version of the flu is known as Canine Cough (often incorrectly referred to as "Kennel Cough".)

Canine Cough is a highly-contagious disease that is passed from dog to dog by moisture droplets. It is possible for your dog to potentially become infected from another dog at the park, not just boarding kennels. Vaccination is simple, effective and given annually. The vaccination protects against the worst strains of the disease (the ones that can cause pneumonia) but it's important to realise that your dog can still contract milder forms of the disease. These dogs may only require a short course of antibiotics to help them recover.